Our Specialties

 

Our Internal Medicine specialties include the following conditions:

Diabetes Melitus
Hypertension
Coronary Artery Disease
Thyroid diseases
COPD
Arthritis
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
Chronic Kidney Failure
Hypercholestrolemia

Diabetes Melitus: Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin or doesn’t make enough insulin.

Various factors may contribute to type 1 diabetes, including genetics and exposure to certain viruses. Although type 1 diabetes typically appears during adolescence, it can develop at any age.

Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure, although it can be managed. With proper treatment, people who have type 1 diabetes can expect to live longer, healthier lives than in the past.

Hypertension: High blood pressure is a common condition in which the force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease.

Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure.

You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases you risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

High blood pressure typically develops over many years, and it affects nearly everyone eventually. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control.

Coronary Artery Disease: Coronary artery disease develops when your coronary arteries – the major blood vessels that supply your heart with blood, oxygen and nutrients – become damaged or diseased. Cholesterol containing deposits (plaques) on your arteries are usually to blame for coronary artery disease.

When plaques build up, they narrow your coronary arteries, causing your heart to receive less blood. Eventually, diminished blood flow may cause chest pain (angina), shortness of breath or other coronary artery disease symptoms. A complete blockage can cause a heart-attack.

Because coronary artery disease often develops over decades, it can virtually go unnoticed until it produces a heart attack. But there’s plenty you can do to prevent and treat coronary artery disease. Start by committing to a healthy lifestyle.

Thyroid diseases

The thyroid gland is located in the front of the neck, just below the voice box (larynx). It produces chemicals (hormones) that help the body control metabolism. Thyroid hormone is normally produces in response to another hormone by the pituitary gland.

There are four main types of thyroid disease:

  • Hyperthyroidism – too much thyroid hormone
  • Hypothyroidism – too little thyroid hormone
  • Benign – (noncancerous) thyroid disease
  • Thyroid cancer

COPD: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to a group of lung diseases that block airflow as you exhale and make it increasingly difficult for you to breathe.

Emphysema and chronic asthmatic bronchitis are the two main conditions to make up COPD. In all cases, damage to your airways eventually interferes with the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your lungs.

COPD is a leading cause of death and illness worldwide. Most COPD is caused by long-term smoking and can be prevented by not smoking or quitting soon after you start. This damage to your lungs can’t be reversed, so treatment focuses on controlling symptoms and minimizing further damage.

Arthritis: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of your joints. The main symptoms of arthritis are joint pain and stiffness, which typically worsen with age. The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteoarthritis is usually caused by normal wear and tear, which rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder. Other types of arthritis can be caused by uric acid crystals, infections or even an underlying disease – such as psoriasis or lupus.

Treatments vary, depending on the type of arthritis. The main goals of arthritis treatments are to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: (GERD) is a chronic digestive disease that occurs when stomach acid or, occasionally, bile flows back (refluxes) into your food pipe (esophagus). The backwash of acid irritates the lining of your esophagus and causes GERD signs and symptoms.

Signs and symptoms of GERD include acid reflux and heartburn. Both are common digestive conditions that many people experience from time to time. When these signs and symptoms occur at least twice a week or interfere with your daily life, doctors call this GERD.

Most people can manage the discomfort of heartburn with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medications. But for people with GERD, these remedies may off only temporary relief. People with GERD may need stronger medications, even surgery, to reduce symptoms.

Chronic Kidney Failure: describes the gradual loss of kidney function. Your kidneys filter wastes and excess fluids from your blood which are then excreted in your urine. When chronic kidney failure damages your kidneys, dangerous levels of fluid and waste can accumulate in your body.

In the early stages of chronic kidney failure, you may have a few signs or symptoms. Chronic kidney failure may not become apparent until your kidney function is significantly impaired.

Treatment for chronic kidney failure, also called chronic kidney disease, focuses on slowing the progression of kidney damage, usually by controlling the underlying cause. Chronic kidney failure can progress to end-stage kidney disease, which is fatal without artificially filtering (dialysis)or a kidney transplant.

Hypercholestrolemia: Cholesterol is a waxy substance that’s found in the fats (lipids) in your blood. While your body needs cholesterol to continue building healthy cells, having high cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease.

When you have high cholesterol, you may develop fatty deposits in your blood vessels. Eventually, these deposits make it difficult for enough blood to flow through your arteries. You heart may not get as much oxygen-rich blood as it needs, which increases the risk of heart attack. Decreased blood flow to your brain can cause a stroke.

High cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) can be inherited, but it is often preventable and treatable. A healthy diet, regular exercise and sometimes medication can go a long way toward reducing high cholesterol.

SunState Medical Associates located at 758 North Sun Drive #104 , Lake Mary, FL . Reviewed by 21 customers rated: 4 / 5